DEFINITION of 'Receivables'

An asset designation applicable to all debts, unsettled transactions or other monetary obligations owed to a company by its debtors or customers. Receivables are recorded by a company's accountants and reported on the balance sheet, and they include all debts owed to the company, even if the debts are not currently due.

BREAKING DOWN 'Receivables'

Receivables are recorded as an asset by the company because it expects to receive payment for the outstanding amounts soon. Long-term receivables, which do not come due for a significant length of time, are recorded as long-term assets on the balance sheet; most short-term receivables are considered part of a company's current assets.

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