Receivables Turnover Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'Receivables Turnover Ratio'

An accounting measure used to quantify a firm's effectiveness in extending credit as well as collecting debts. The receivables turnover ratio is an activity ratio, measuring how efficiently a firm uses its assets.

Formula:

Receivables Turnover Ratio

Some companies' reports will only show sales - this can affect the ratio depending on the size of cash sales.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Receivables Turnover Ratio'

By maintaining accounts receivable, firms are indirectly extending interest-free loans to their clients. A high ratio implies either that a company operates on a cash basis or that its extension of credit and collection of accounts receivable is efficient.

A low ratio implies the company should re-assess its credit policies in order to ensure the timely collection of imparted credit that is not earning interest for the firm.

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