Recognition Lag

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Recognition Lag'

The time lag between when an actual economic shock, such as sudden boom or bust occurs, and when it is recognized by economists, central bankers and the government.

The recognition lag is studied in conjunction with implementation lag and response lag, two other measures of time lags within an economy. Recognition lags may be days, weeks, or months, depending on the nature and severity of the economic shock or shift.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Recognition Lag'

Followers of the market are familiar with the phenomenon of when economists signal a recession in the economy several months after it has actually begun. This is because it can take several months for data metrics that are studied to predict economic shifts to be aggregated and published for the investing public.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Discount Rate

    The interest rate charged to commercial banks and other depository ...
  2. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting ...
  3. Implementation Lag

    The time lag between when a macroeconomic shock or other adverse ...
  4. Discount Window

    Credit facilities in which financial institutions go to borrow ...
  5. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
  6. Monetary Policy

    The actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. No results found.
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Breaking Down The Fed Model

    Learn what pundits mean when they say that stocks are undervalued according to the Fed model.
  2. Personal Finance

    How The U.S. Government Formulates Monetary Policy

    Learn about the tools the Fed uses to influence interest rates and general economic conditions.
  3. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  4. Economics

    The Importance Of Inflation And GDP

    Learn the underlying theories behind these concepts and what they can mean for your portfolio.
  5. Investing Basics

    Interest Rates And Your Bond Investments

    By understanding the factors that influence interest rates, you can learn to anticipate their movement and profit from it.
  6. Investing

    Looking To Invest In the Third-Largest Pharmacy?

    Rite Aid Corporation's $4 billion purchase of the Eckerd retail pharmacy chain during the Great Recession might not have been its savviest decision.
  7. Economics

    What's Demand Elasticity?

    Demand elasticity is the measure of how demand changes as other factors change. Demand elasticity is often referred to as price elasticity of demand because price is most often the factor used ...
  8. Economics

    Law of Supply

    The law of supply is one of the most fundamental principles in microeconomics. According to the law of supply, for all other things remaining constant, the higher the price of a good or service, ...
  9. Economics

    What's a Subsidy?

    A subsidy is a benefit given to an individual, business or institution, typically by the government. Subsidies are given to promote a social good or an economic policy. The government usually ...
  10. Economics

    What's Stagflation?

    Stagflation is the term for an economic period of slow growth, relatively high unemployment and rising prices. Other indicators of stagflation are reductions in gross domestic product and other ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  2. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  3. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
  4. Law Of Supply

    A microeconomic law stating that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity ...
  5. Investment Grade

    A rating that indicates that a municipal or corporate bond has a relatively low risk of default. Bond rating firms, such ...
  6. Fringe Benefits

    A collection of various benefits provided by an employer, which are exempt from taxation as long as certain conditions are ...
Trading Center