Record High

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DEFINITION of 'Record High'

The highest historical price level reached by a security, commodity or index during trading. The record high is measured from when the instrument first starts trading and updates whenever the last record high is exceeded. The values for record highs are usually nominal, which means they do not account for inflation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Record High'

All-time record highs typically represent significant price news for companies. Investors may be enticed to purchase stock, believing this company will continue to perform well in the future. Companies who constantly reach record highs quickly catch the eyes of prospective investors, while those who repeatedly hit record lows tend to scare off buyers.

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