Record Low

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DEFINITION of 'Record Low'

The lowest historical price level reached by a security, commodity or index during trading. A record low can be reached during a trading day, and is recorded regardless of whether it is the closing price. Record lows tend to be nominal values, which do not account for inflation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Record Low'

Hitting an all-time record low is usually bad news for a publicly traded company. While some investors may be tempted into buying at such a low price, most buyers will be less optimistic about the situation and shy away from the stock. Companies who constantly hit record lows will typically struggle to rebound in value.

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