Recording Fee

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DEFINITION of 'Recording Fee'

The fee charged by a government agency for registering or recording a real estate purchase or sale, so that it becomes a matter of public record. Recording fees are generally charged by the county (such as in the United States), since it maintains records of all property purchases and sales. The recording fee varies from county to county.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Recording Fee'

Apart from a title to a property, the county also records mortgages and other liens against the property. The recording fee therefore also depends on the type and complexity of the real estate transaction.

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