Recoverable Reserves

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Recoverable Reserves'

A term used in natural resource industries to describe the amount of resources identified in a reserve that is technologically or economically feasible to extract. A new reserve can be discovered, but if the resource cannot be extracted by any known technological methods, then it would not be considered part of recoverable reserves. Recoverable reserves is also often called proved reserves.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Recoverable Reserves'

Alternatively, "unproved reserves" is an estimate of the amount of reserves that have been discovered by geological or engineering methods, but there would be uncertainties as to whether the reserves could be technically or economically produced.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Possible Reserves

    An estimate of the amount of oil or natural gas reserves that ...
  2. Rig Utilization Rate

    A ratio used in the oil services industry that measures the amount ...
  3. Energy Sector

    A category of stocks that relate to producing or supplying energy. ...
  4. Oil Sands

    Sand and rock material which contains crude bitumen (a heavy, ...
  5. Peak Oil

    A hypothetical date referring to the world's peak crude oil production, ...
  6. Barrels Of Oil Equivalent Per Day ...

    A term that is used often in conjunction with the production ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Does location matter for taxes when calculating gross sales?

    Tax policies regarding gross sales differ by state and region. Some city jurisdictions, counties and states require a percentage ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why would you use the TTM (trailing twelve months) rather than the data from the ...

    Public companies report their yearly financial statements along with an annual report. However, financial professionals are ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why is it important for an investor to understand business accounting?

    Investors use financial statements to obtain valuable information used in valuation and credit analysis of companies. Therefore, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the business consequences of using FIFO vs. LIFO accounting methods?

    If a company uses a first-in, first-out accounting method (FIFO), it's likely that its reported earnings will be higher than ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do you analyze inventory on the balance sheet?

    In accounting, inventory represents a company's raw materials, work in progress and finished products. Financial professionals ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    Oil And Gas Industry Primer

    Before jumping into this hot sector, learn how these companies make their money.
  2. Active Trading

    Uncovering Oil And Gas Futures

    Find out how to stay on top of data reports that could cause volatility in oil and gas markets.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Investing In Oil And Gas UITs

    Unit investment trusts provide direct exposure to the energy sector, fueling better returns.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Accounting For Differences In Oil And Gas Accounting

    How a company accounts for its expenses affects how its net income and cash flow numbers are reported.
  5. Economics

    What is a Management Buyout?

    A management buyout, or MBO, is a transaction where a company's management team purchases the assets and operations of the business they manage.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Cash On Delivery

    Cash on delivery, also referred to as COD, is a method of shipping goods to buyers who do not have credit terms with the seller.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding the Simple Random Sample

    A simple random sample is a subset of a statistical population in which each member of the subset has an equal probability of being chosen.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining the Spot Rate

    The spot rate is the immediate purchase price posted on exchanges for purchasing commodities, currency and securities.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Geometric Mean

    The average of a set of products, the calculation of which is commonly used to determine the performance results of an investment ...
  2. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  3. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  4. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  5. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  6. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
Trading Center