Recoverable Reserves

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Recoverable Reserves'

A term used in natural resource industries to describe the amount of resources identified in a reserve that is technologically or economically feasible to extract. A new reserve can be discovered, but if the resource cannot be extracted by any known technological methods, then it would not be considered part of recoverable reserves. Recoverable reserves is also often called proved reserves.

BREAKING DOWN 'Recoverable Reserves'

Alternatively, "unproved reserves" is an estimate of the amount of reserves that have been discovered by geological or engineering methods, but there would be uncertainties as to whether the reserves could be technically or economically produced.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Possible Reserves

    An estimate of the amount of oil or natural gas reserves that ...
  2. Rig Utilization Rate

    A ratio used in the oil services industry that measures the amount ...
  3. Energy Sector

    A category of stocks that relate to producing or supplying energy. ...
  4. Oil Sands

    Sand and rock material which contains crude bitumen (a heavy, ...
  5. Peak Oil

    A hypothetical date referring to the world's peak crude oil production, ...
  6. Barrels Of Oil Equivalent Per Day ...

    A term that is used often in conjunction with the production ...
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    Oil And Gas Industry Primer

    Before jumping into this hot sector, learn how these companies make their money.
  2. Active Trading

    Uncovering Oil And Gas Futures

    Find out how to stay on top of data reports that could cause volatility in oil and gas markets.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Investing In Oil And Gas UITs

    Unit investment trusts provide direct exposure to the energy sector, fueling better returns.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Accounting For Differences In Oil And Gas Accounting

    How a company accounts for its expenses affects how its net income and cash flow numbers are reported.
  5. Investing Basics

    What's Current Portion of Long-Term Debt?

    The current portion of long-term debt is the part of a company’s long-term debt that must be repaid within the next year.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Cost Control

    For a business, cost control entails managing and reducing expenses.
  7. Investing Basics

    Breaking Down Optimal Capital Structure

    An optimal capital structure shows the best balance of debt to equity a company can have in order to minimize its cost of capital.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: United States Gasoline Fund

    Learn about the United States Gasoline Fund, the characteristics of the exchange-traded fund, and the suitability and recommendations of it.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: United States 12 Month Oil

    Find out more information about the United States 12 Month Oil ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the characteristics, suitability and recommendations of it.
  10. Economics

    Explaining Accounting Conservatism

    Accounting conservatism is a principal that requires accounting rules be applied with high degrees of verification.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are dividends considered an expense?

    Cash or stock dividends distributed to shareholders are not considered an expense on a company's income statement. Stock ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do dividends go on the balance sheet?

    The only account recorded on the balance sheet, when dividends are declared and before they are paid out to a company's shareholders, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Depreciation

    1. A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life. Businesses depreciate long-term assets for both ...
  2. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  3. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  4. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  5. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  6. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!