Recoverable Reserves

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DEFINITION of 'Recoverable Reserves'

A term used in natural resource industries to describe the amount of resources identified in a reserve that is technologically or economically feasible to extract. A new reserve can be discovered, but if the resource cannot be extracted by any known technological methods, then it would not be considered part of recoverable reserves. Recoverable reserves is also often called proved reserves.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Recoverable Reserves'

Alternatively, "unproved reserves" is an estimate of the amount of reserves that have been discovered by geological or engineering methods, but there would be uncertainties as to whether the reserves could be technically or economically produced.

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