Recoverable Reserves

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Recoverable Reserves'

A term used in natural resource industries to describe the amount of resources identified in a reserve that is technologically or economically feasible to extract. A new reserve can be discovered, but if the resource cannot be extracted by any known technological methods, then it would not be considered part of recoverable reserves. Recoverable reserves is also often called proved reserves.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Recoverable Reserves'

Alternatively, "unproved reserves" is an estimate of the amount of reserves that have been discovered by geological or engineering methods, but there would be uncertainties as to whether the reserves could be technically or economically produced.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Possible Reserves

    An estimate of the amount of oil or natural gas reserves that ...
  2. Rig Utilization Rate

    A ratio used in the oil services industry that measures the amount ...
  3. Energy Sector

    A category of stocks that relate to producing or supplying energy. ...
  4. Oil Sands

    Sand and rock material which contains crude bitumen (a heavy, ...
  5. Peak Oil

    A hypothetical date referring to the world's peak crude oil production, ...
  6. Barrels Of Oil Equivalent Per Day ...

    A term that is used often in conjunction with the production ...
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    Oil And Gas Industry Primer

    Before jumping into this hot sector, learn how these companies make their money.
  2. Active Trading

    Uncovering Oil And Gas Futures

    Find out how to stay on top of data reports that could cause volatility in oil and gas markets.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Investing In Oil And Gas UITs

    Unit investment trusts provide direct exposure to the energy sector, fueling better returns.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Accounting For Differences In Oil And Gas Accounting

    How a company accounts for its expenses affects how its net income and cash flow numbers are reported.
  5. Markets

    What Is The Current Market Supply For Oil?

    Oil prices skidded by more than 10 %, sparking a sell-off in U.S. equities of 3.5 %, a Treasury rally and global headlines of growth fears and tumult.
  6. Investing Basics

    What is the difference between tangible and intangible assets?

    Discover the difference between tangible assets and intangible assets and the types of assets that are in each. Additionally, learn where these are recorded.
  7. Economics

    What regulations are in place that affect fracking?

    Read about some of the regulations that impact the practice of hydraulic fracturing, which is used to increase oil and gas well output.
  8. Economics

    What causes oil prices to fluctuate?

    Discover how OPEC, demand and supply, natural disasters, production costs and political instability are some of the major causes in oil price fluctuation.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between profitability and profit?

    Calculating company profit and profitability are not one and the same, and investors should understand the difference between the two terms.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Should companies break out accounts receivables into subledgers?

    Find out why every company that sells on credit should break down its accounts receivable into individual customer subsidiary ledgers, or subledgers.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  2. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  3. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  4. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  5. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  6. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
Trading Center