Recovery Property

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DEFINITION

A specific class of depreciable real estate. Recovery property describes tangible depreciable property placed in service between 1980-1987, and is eligible for Accelerated Cost Recovery System (ACRS) treatment. The ACRS election was allowed on a property-by-property basis.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The ACRS recovery period for recovery property has long-since expired, and all real estate that qualified as recovery property is now fully depreciated. As a result, any ACRS recovery property that is now declared on a tax return should be carefully investigated to ensure validity. ACRS was replaced by the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) in 1986.


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