Recurring Revenue

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DEFINITION of 'Recurring Revenue'

The portion of a company's revenue that is highly likely to continue in the future. This is revenue that is predictable, stable and can be counted on in the future with a high degree of certainty.

BREAKING DOWN 'Recurring Revenue'

For example, a cable company that has millions of customers paying monthly could consider a large portion of its monthly revenues to be recurring in nature. Many market pundits consider recurring revenue to be a highly desirable quality for a company to have.

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