Red

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DEFINITION of 'Red'

A term relating to a negative balance on a company's financial statements.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Red'

The phrase "in the red" is used widely to refer to companies that have not been profitable within their last accounting period. This term is derived from the color of ink used to by accountants to enter a negative figure on a company's financial statements.

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