Redemption

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DEFINITION of 'Redemption'

The return of an investor's principal in a fixed income security, such as a preferred stock or bond; or the sale of units in a mutual fund. A redemption occurs, in a fixed income security at par or at a premium price, upon maturity or cancellation by the issuer. Redemptions occur with mutual funds, at the choice of the investor, however limitations by the issuer may exist, such as minimum holding periods.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Redemption'

Redemption of mutual fund shares from a mutual fund company must occur within seven days of receiving a request for redemption from the investor. Some mutual funds, may have redemption fees attached, in the place of a back-end load. It is important to note which units should be redeemed when choosing to sell mutual funds within a portfolio.

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