Rediscount

What is 'Rediscount'

Rediscount is the act of discounting a short-term negotiable debt instrument for a second time. Banks may rediscount these short-term debt securities to assist the movement of a market that has a high demand for loans. When there is low liquidity in the market, banks can generate cash by rediscounting short-term securities.

BREAKING DOWN 'Rediscount'

A central bank's discount facility is often called a discount window. The term comes from the days when a clerk would go to a window at the central bank to rediscount a company's securities.

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