Reduced Spread


DEFINITION of 'Reduced Spread'

A reduction in the spread between the buy/bid and sell/ask price for a security, currency, or loan. In most cases, a reduction in the spread signifies that a financial institution will experience a decline in its profit margin that it earns on its spread.

BREAKING DOWN 'Reduced Spread'

A reduced spread in loan rates translates to a reduction between the cost of funds for the lender and the rate at which these funds are lent out. Lending institutions can reduce their spread in response to factors such as, more competition from other creditors, less perceived risk in the lending market due to favorable economic conditions, or increased liquidity in the secondary market for these loans.

A reduced spread in currency markets will lower the difference between what a currency purchase is at and what the same currency is sold at. This could be due to an increase in expected volume. Bid-ask spreads contribute to the inefficiencies of matching currency buyers with sellers.

A reduced spread in the equity markets is a reduction in the gap between what a market maker is willing to buy or sell a stock at, if there is no other counter party for an order. This is done to ensure liquidity in the trading market, and to allow some additional profit to be generated. Spread goals of registered traders vary by company, depending on trading activity, issuer size and public float.

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