Reflation

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DEFINITION of 'Reflation'

A fiscal or monetary policy, designed to expand a country's output and curb the effects of deflation. Reflation policies can include reducing taxes, changing the money supply and lowering interest rates.

The term "reflation" is also used to describe the first phase of economic recovery after a period of contraction.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Reflation'

Reflation policy has been used by American governments, to try and restart failed business expansions since the early 1600s. Although almost every government tries in some form or another to avoid the collapse of an economy after a recent boom, none have ever succeeded in being able to avoid the contraction phase of the business cycle. Many academics actually believe government agitation only delays the recovery and worsens the effects.

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