Regional Stock Exchange

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DEFINITION of 'Regional Stock Exchange'

A place outside of a country's primary financial center where equity in publicly-held companies is traded. Companies that cannot meet the strict listing requirements of national exchanges may qualify to trade on regional exchanges. Companies can choose to list on more than one exchange if they meet the criteria for registration.

BREAKING DOWN 'Regional Stock Exchange'

The Philadelphia Stock Exchange in the early 1900s is an example of a regional stock exchange, whereas the New York Stock Exchange and the London Stock Exchange are examples of national stock exchanges. The stock exchange in Cote D'Ivoire, which was the financial center for eight countries in West Africa as of 2011, is another example of a regional stock exchange. A regional stock exchange can help to increase listings, liquidity and capitalization.

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