Regressive Tax


DEFINITION of 'Regressive Tax'

A tax that takes a larger percentage from low-income people than from high-income people. A regressive tax is generally a tax that is applied uniformly. This means that it hits lower-income individuals harder.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Regressive Tax'

Some examples include gas tax and cigarette tax. For example, if a person has $10 of income and must pay $1 of tax on a package of cigarettes, this represents 10% of the person's income. However, if the person has $20 of income, this $1 tax only represents 5% of that person's income.

Sales taxes that apply to essentials are generally considered to be regressive as well because expenses for food, clothing and shelter tend to make up a higher percentage of a lower income consumer's overall budget. In this case, even though the tax may be uniform (such as 7% sales tax), lower income consumers are more affected by it because they are less able to afford it.

  1. Cascade Tax

    A tax that is levied on a good at each stage of the production ...
  2. Ability-To-Pay Taxation

    Taxation in the form of a progressive tax. The ability-to-pay ...
  3. Flat Tax

    A system that applies the same tax rate to every taxpayer regardless ...
  4. Income Tax

    A tax that governments impose on financial income generated by ...
  5. Tax Bracket

    The rate at which an individual is taxed. Tax brackets are set ...
  6. Progressive Tax

    A tax that takes a larger percentage from the income of high-income ...
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