Regulation CC


DEFINITION of 'Regulation CC'

One of the banking regulations set forth by the Federal Reserve. Regulation CC implements the Expedited Funds Availability Act of 1987. This act sets certain standards for endorsements on checks that are paid by banks and other depository institutions.


Regulation CC is designed to require financial institutions to correctly process endorsed checks. The rules pertaining to endorsements are intended to correctly identify the endorsing bank. Unpaid checks are also required to be immediately returned to the paying bank.

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