Regulation EE

DEFINITION of 'Regulation EE'

A regulation set forth by the Federal Reserve. Regulation EE, also sometimes referred to as netting eligibility for financial institutions, gives banks permission to settle mutual obligations at their net value instead of their gross value. This form of settlement is known as contractual netting.

BREAKING DOWN 'Regulation EE'

Regulation EE allows banks to settle obligations they have to each other through the use of bi- or multi-lateral netting contracts. Securities broker/dealers can also settle trades in this manner. Members of clearing organizations are likewise included.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Can an EE bond be cashed before it has reached it's maturity date?

  2. What is the difference between EE and I Bonds?

    Read about the similarities and differences between the EE and I savings bond programs created by the U.S. Department of ... Read Answer >>
  3. Do you have to report the interest on maturing EE & HH bonds or can you defer interest ...

  4. What is the difference between payment netting and close-out netting?

    Learn about the risk reduction practice of netting, and specifically the differences between payment netting and close-out ... Read Answer >>
  5. How long will it take for a bond to reach its face value?

    Learn when different savings bonds reach face value, and determine the best time to cash them in to get the highest return ... Read Answer >>
  6. What impact does government regulation have on the financial services sector?

    Learn about how the financial services industry is affected by government regulation, and the different types of regulations ... Read Answer >>
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