Regulation K

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Regulation K'

One of the regulations set forth by the Federal Reserve. Regulation K provides governance on the international banking front, offering guidelines for bank holding companies that engage in international trade and also foreign banks located domestically. It limits the kinds of business and financial practices and transactions in which foreign banks located domestically can participate.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Regulation K'

Regulation K allows corporations that qualify under the Edge Act to participate in a wide variety of global banking practices. It also allows domestic banks to own entire nonfinancial foreign business entities. Reserve requirements are also imposed on Edge Act corporations under this statute.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Regulation 9

    A regulation that permits national banks to open and operate ...
  2. Regulation CC

    One of the banking regulations set forth by the Federal Reserve. ...
  3. Regulation AA

    A regulation designed to address practices by banks that are ...
  4. Regulation B

    A regulation intended to prevent discrimination against applicants ...
  5. Regulation C

    A regulation that implements the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act ...
  6. Edge Act Corporation

    A banking institution with a special charter from the U.S. Federal ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between consumer surplus and economic surplus?

    The consumer surplus is the difference between the highest price a consumer is willing to pay and the actual market price ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is accounting in the United States different from international accounting?

    Despite major efforts by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, and the International Accounting Standards Board, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does it signify about a given product if the consumer surplus figure for that ...

    High consumer surplus for a particular product signifies a high level of utility for consumers and may carry some implications ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are common reasons for governments to implement tariffs?

    A tariff is a tax imposed by a governing authority on goods or services entering or leaving the country and is typically ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How are transfer prices set?

    The United States, like most nations, does not want to allow transfer pricing methods that reduce the amount of taxes the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does mercantilism impede global economic growth?

    Mercantilism impedes global economic growth by leading producers to specialize in goods and services that do not take account ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Credit & Loans

    The Evolution Of Banking

    Banks are a part of ancient history. Find out how this system of money management developed into what we know today.
  2. Personal Finance

    How The U.S. Government Formulates Monetary Policy

    Learn about the tools the Fed uses to influence interest rates and general economic conditions.
  3. Forex Education

    Get To Know The Major Central Banks

    The policies of these banks affect the currency market like nothing else. See what makes them tick.
  4. Personal Finance

    How The Federal Reserve Was Formed

    Find out how this institution has stabilized the U.S. economy during economic downturn.
  5. Economics

    What is a Capital Account?

    Capital account is an economic term that refers to the net change in investment and asset ownership for a nation.
  6. Economics

    Understanding the Fisher Effect

    The Fisher effect states that the real interest rate equals the nominal interest rate minus the expected inflation rate.
  7. Investing

    The Labor Market Recovery’s Missing Ingredient

    Job creation is running at the fastest pace since the 90s, and there is some evidence that wage growth is finally starting to accelerate, albeit modestly.
  8. Economics

    Gambling on Macau: Too Risky?

    Macau was once heralded as the new Las Vegas for casino investors. Is it too late?
  9. Investing

    Pockets Of Value In The Stock Market

    U.S. stocks benefited from signs the Fed’s path toward higher interest rates, as well as from continued merger-and-acquisition activity on of low rates.
  10. Economics

    When To Expect Fed Liftoff Now

    “When will the Fed raise interest rates?” That has been the question of many investors since the Fed indicated it was prepared to end its zero rate policy.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fixed-Income Arbitrage

    An investment strategy that attempts to profit from arbitrage opportunities in interest rate securities. When using a fixed-income ...
  2. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  3. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  4. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  5. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  6. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
Trading Center