Regulation D - Reg D

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DEFINITION of 'Regulation D - Reg D'

A Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulation governing private placement exemptions. Reg D allows usually smaller companies to raise capital through the sale of equity or debt securities without having to register their securities with the SEC.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Regulation D - Reg D'

Reg D offerings are advantageous to any private company or entrepreneur because they allow an entity to obtain funding faster and to avoid the costs associated with a public offering.

Even if the transaction only involves one or two investors, the company or entrepreneur wanting to raise capital still needs to provide the proper framework and disclosure documentation; however, these requirements are significantly less than what is required for a public offering.

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