Regulation T - Reg T

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DEFINITION of 'Regulation T - Reg T'

The Federal Reserve Board regulation that governs customer cash accounts and the amount of credit that brokerage firms and dealers may extend to customers for the purchase of securities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Regulation T - Reg T'

According to Regulation T, you may borrow up to 50% of the purchase price of securities that can be purchased on margin. This is known as the initial margin.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the different types of margin calls?

    Margin is much like buying stocks on loan. An investor borrows funds from a brokerage firm to purchase stocks and pays interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is buying on margin regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)?

    The Federal Reserve Board and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) regulate buying on margin to a greater ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between initial margin and maintenance margin?

    Buying securities on margin can be advantageous for an investor. Profit is magnified if there is a gain, and losses are as ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do you need a margin account to short sell stocks?

    The reason that margin accounts and only margin accounts can be used to short sell stocks has to do with Regulation T, a ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the minimum margin requirements for a short sale account?

    In a short sale transaction, the investor borrows shares and sells them on the market in the hope that the share price will ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What kinds of financial instruments are designated as “Securities” by Cabinet Order?

    In Japan, securities are regulated by the Diet and the Financial Services Agency, or FSA. Rulings about securities come down ... Read Full Answer >>
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