Regulation U

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Regulation U'

The Federal Reserve Board regulation that governs loans by banks for the purchase of securities on margin. Regulation U limits the amount of leverage a bank or brokerage can extend to a borrower for the purposes of puchasing stocks, mutual funds and other market-traded securities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Regulation U'

Regulation U is designed to mitigate the adherent risk that exists when using leverage, especially when too much leverage is granted to an individual or business. By limiting the margin amount, Regulation U aims to limit the potential losses that both borrowers and banks or lenders can sustain in instances where leverage can lead to very large losses relative to the physical capital extended.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Margin

    1. Borrowed money that is used to purchase securities. This practice ...
  2. Regulation Fair Disclosure - Reg ...

    A rule passed by the Securities and Exchange Commission in an ...
  3. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
  4. Callable Bond

    A bond that can be redeemed by the issuer prior to its maturity. ...
  5. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
  6. Federal Reserve System - FRS

    The central bank of the United States. The Fed, as it is commonly ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    The Federal Reserve

    Few organizations can move the market like the Federal Reserve. As an investor, it's important to understand exactly what the Fed does and how it influences the economy.
  2. Investing Basics

    Finding Your Margin Investment Sweet Spot

    Borrowing to increase profits isn't for the faint of heart, but margin trading can mean big returns.
  3. Forex Education

    Leverage's "Double-Edged Sword" Need Not Cut Deep

    Learn to cut out losses quickly, leaving profits room to grow.
  4. Insurance

    Avoid The No-Health-Insurance Penalty By Feb 15

    If you don't have health insurance, act NOW or you could owe penalties on your 2015 taxes, in addition to this year's.
  5. Economics

    The Economic and Social Effects of Corruption

    Corruption results in inefficiencies in the operations of emerging economies, and prevents such economies from reaching the maximum level of development.
  6. Economics

    What's a Command Economy?

    A command economy is one where the government controls the economy, acting as the central planner, dictating production quotas and distribution levels, and setting prices. Such economies exist ...
  7. Investing Basics

    What is the difference between a REIT and a real estate fund?

    A real estate fund invests in securities offered by public real estate properties directly or indirectly through Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs).
  8. Economics

    Can state and local governments in the US run fiscal deficits?

    Discover why most state and local governments do not – or cannot – run fiscal deficits in the same manner as the U.S. federal government.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What does the term 'invisible hand' refer to in the economy?

    Discover and understand the concept of the "invisible hand" as explained by Adam Smith, considered the founder of modern economic theory.
  10. Economics

    Why is President Obama hesitant to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline project?

    Find out how President Obama's hesitancy over the Keystone XL pipeline project is motivated by political pressure from two opposing factions.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  2. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  3. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
  4. Break-Even Analysis

    An analysis to determine the point at which revenue received equals the costs associated with receiving the revenue. Break-even ...
  5. Key Performance Indicators - KPI

    A set of quantifiable measures that a company or industry uses to gauge or compare performance in terms of meeting their ...
  6. Bank Guarantee

    A guarantee from a lending institution ensuring that the liabilities of a debtor will be met. In other words, if the debtor ...
Trading Center