DEFINITION of 'Reykjavik Interbank Offered Rate - REIBOR'

The formal interbank market rate for short term loans at Icelandic commercial and savings banks. Similar to how most countries use LIBOR as the base rate for variable rate loans, Icelandic banks use REIBOR (plus a premium) as the basis for supplying variable interest rate loans.

BREAKING DOWN 'Reykjavik Interbank Offered Rate - REIBOR'

The REIBOR is applied almost exclusively to the borrowing of the Icelandic currency, the Kronur. Market participants can make bids to the interbank market that extend overnight, one week, two weeks, three months, six months, nine months and one year. This incarnation of REIBOR is relatively new as it only formally began operating in 1998.

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