Relative Purchase Power Parity

DEFINITION of 'Relative Purchase Power Parity'

An expansion of the purchase power parity theory, which suggests that prices in countries vary for the same product but that they differ by the same proportional rate over time. The reasons suggested for this price difference include taxes, shipping costs and differences in product quality.

BREAKING DOWN 'Relative Purchase Power Parity'

The relative purchase power parity condition suggests that countries with higher rates of inflation will have a devalued currency.

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