Relisted

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DEFINITION of 'Relisted'

The return to listed status for a stock after having been delisted from an exchange for not being in compliance with the exchange's listing requirements. A company's stock may be delisted either by the exchange or voluntarily for a number of reasons including bankruptcy, failure to file mandatory reports, or a depressed share price that is below the exchange's minimum threshold. Once the company puts its house in order and meets the listing requirements, it can apply to relist its shares.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Relisted'

Unlike a hot initial public offering (IPO), the reception from investors to a company's relisting is likely to be mixed, as it may be weighed down by its past record. Historically, few companies have gone on to reach their previous highs after relisting their shares.

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