DEFINITION of 'Relisted'

The return to listed status for a stock after having been delisted from an exchange for not being in compliance with the exchange's listing requirements. A company's stock may be delisted either by the exchange or voluntarily for a number of reasons including bankruptcy, failure to file mandatory reports, or a depressed share price that is below the exchange's minimum threshold. Once the company puts its house in order and meets the listing requirements, it can apply to relist its shares.


Unlike a hot initial public offering (IPO), the reception from investors to a company's relisting is likely to be mixed, as it may be weighed down by its past record. Historically, few companies have gone on to reach their previous highs after relisting their shares.

  1. Admission Board

    The representatives of a particular stock exchange who determine ...
  2. Listing Requirements

    Various standards that are established by stock exchanges (such ...
  3. Over-The-Counter - OTC

    Over-The-Counter (or OTC) is a security traded in some context ...
  4. Delisting

    The removal of a listed security from the exchange on which it ...
  5. Bankruptcy

    A legal proceeding involving a person or business that is unable ...
  6. Unlisted Security

    A financial instrument that is not traded on an exchange, but ...
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  1. What are the rules behind the delisting of a stock?

    The criteria to remain listed on an exchange differs from one exchange to another. On the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. If a stock is delisted, do shareholders still own the stock?

    If a company has been delisted, it is no longer trading on a major exchange, but the owners of the company shares are not ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. I own shares of a company that just received a delisting notice from Nasdaq. Does ...

    Let's start by walking through the reasons for listing requirements and what happens when a company's stock is delisted from ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Can mutual funds invest in IPOs?

    Mutual funds can invest in initial public offerings (IPOS). However, most mutual funds have bylaws that prevent them from ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What kind of assets can be traded on a secondary market?

    Virtually all types of financial assets and investing instruments are traded on secondary markets, including stocks, bonds, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why would a company decide to utilize H-shares over A-shares in its IPO?

    A company would decide to utilize H shares over A shares in its initial public offering (IPO) if that company believes it ... Read Full Answer >>

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