Remainder Man

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DEFINITION of 'Remainder Man'

The person who receives the principal remaining in a trust account after all other required payments have been made, such as those to the beneficiary and expenses.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Remainder Man'

The remainder man may exercise the right to hold and use the property in the trust only after the trust has been completely dissolved.

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