Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits - REMIC


DEFINITION of 'Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits - REMIC'

A complex pool of mortgage securities created for the purpose of acquiring collateral. This base is then divided into varying classes of securities backed by mortgages with different maturities and coupons.

BREAKING DOWN 'Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits - REMIC'

As a synthetic investment vehicle, REMICs consist of a fixed pool of mortgages broken apart and marketed to investors as individual securities.

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  1. What is the difference between adjusted and regular funds from operations?

    While regular funds from operations measures the cash flow generated by the operations of a real estate investment trust ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are examples of typical leasehold improvements?

    Typical leasehold improvements include partitioning a large, open space into smaller, more structured areas such as dressing ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How much of the global economy is comprised of the real estate sector?

    The commercial and residential real estate industry generated an estimated $3 trillion in 2014, with some 35% of sector revenue ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between "closed end credit" and a "line of credit?"

    Depending on the need, an individual or business may take out a form of credit that is either open- or closed-ended. While ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. In what instances does a business use closed end credit?

    The most common types of closed-end credit used by both businesses and individuals are mortgages and auto loans. Businesses ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the long-term effects of delinquent accounts?

    Delinquency occurs when borrowers fail to make payments on their loans. All loan borrowers should do their best to avoid ... Read Full Answer >>

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