Remote Disbursement

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Remote Disbursement'

A cash-management technique that some businesses use to increase their float by taking advantage of the Federal Reserve System's check-clearing inefficiencies. A company that practices remote disbursement intentionally draws its checks on a bank in a location that is geographically remote from whomever it needs to send checks to. It does this to maximize disbursement float, which represents a reduction in book cash but no current change in actual cash in the bank. This means the company still has the money in its bank account and can keep earning interest on it. Using remote disbursement can also allow a company to keep a smaller amount of cash on hand and more of its money in higher-interest-paying accounts.

A company that wants to use remote disbursement to its full advantage needs to also minimize its collection float, or the time it takes to receive payments. Companies can speed up their collections through techniques that reduce float, such as concentration banking and lockbox banking. By slowing down payments and speeding up collections, a company increases its net float and therefore its cash balance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Remote Disbursement'

The Federal Reserve discourages the practice of remote disbursement. It clears almost all checks within two business days, so it is the Fed, not the writer nor the recipient of the check, that loses in the remote-disbursement game. The recipient never has to wait more than two days to receive payment, so it will not necessarily object to doing business with companies that practice remote disbursement.

Other ways companies extend disbursement float include zero-balance accounts and purchasing supplies and services on credit (managing trade payables).

RELATED TERMS
  1. Float

    Money in the banking system that is briefly counted twice due ...
  2. Federal Reserve Float

    Refers to the over-estimation of the country's money supply due ...
  3. Concentration Bank

    A financial institution that is the primary bank of an organization, ...
  4. Zero Balance Account - ZBA

    A checking account in which a balance of zero is maintained by ...
  5. Float Time

    The amount of time between when an individual writes and submits ...
  6. Federal Reserve System - FRS

    The central bank of the United States. The Fed, as it is commonly ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the Federal Reserve Board's market risk capital rule?

    The Federal Reserve Board’s market risk capital rule, or MRR, sets forth the capital requirements for banking organizations ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do businesses determine if an asset may be impaired?

    In the United States, assets are considered impaired when net carrying value (book value) exceeds expected future cash flows. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can I set up an accrual accounting system for a small business?

    First, determine whether accrual accounting makes the most sense practically and financially. If the small business is also ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why is work in progress (WIP) considered a current asset in accounting?

    Accountants consider work in progress (WIP) to be a current asset because it is a type of inventory asset. Accountants consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What exactly does EBITDA margin tell investors about a company?

    EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA margins provide investors a snapshot ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Ben Bernanke: Background And Philosophy

    Get some insight into the man at the forefront of key U.S economic decisions.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Breaking Down The Fed Model

    Learn what pundits mean when they say that stocks are undervalued according to the Fed model.
  3. Personal Finance

    How The Federal Reserve Was Formed

    Find out how this institution has stabilized the U.S. economy during economic downturn.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  5. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Last In First Out Is Banned Under IFRS

    We explain why Last-In-First-Out is banned under IFRS
  7. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  8. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Property, Plant and Equipment

    Property, plant and equipment are company assets that are vital to business operations, but not easily liquidated.
  10. Economics

    How to Calculate Trailing 12 Months Income

    Trailing 12 months refers to the most recently completed one-year period of a company’s financial performance.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  2. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  3. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
  4. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
  5. Wash Trading

    The process of buying shares of a company through one broker while selling shares through a different broker. Wash trading ...
Trading Center