Re-Offer Price

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DEFINITION of 'Re-Offer Price'

A price at which the underwriting syndicate of a debt issue resells the bonds to public investors. The syndicate will purchase the bonds for a specified amount from the issuing firm and re-offer the bonds to the public, usually at a different price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Re-Offer Price'

An underwriting investment bank may facilitate a debt issue by agreeing to purchase all of the bonds for a price below face value. Having the underwriters purchase the bond issue, instead of passing the sale onto the public, removes the company's risk of not selling the entire issue. The investment banker will re-offer the bonds to public investors at a higher price, which may be above (premium) slightly below (discount) par value. In a serial issue, most common to municipal GO bonds, the first bonds to mature are frequently at a premium with a higher coupon rate. The last bonds to mature in the offering are sometimes sold at a discount, but carry a lower coupon rate.

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