Repatriable

DEFINITION of 'Repatriable'

Refers to the ability of an asset to be moved from a foreign country back to an investor's home country. Assets such as cash and securities are considered highly repatriable, while assets such as foreign real estate and business ownership are considered to have a low level of repatriability. Barriers to repatriation may include the physical nature of the asset, laws of the foreign country, and laws of the investor's home country.

BREAKING DOWN 'Repatriable'

Many Americans have legally and/or illegally moved their assets "offshore" to protect them from both lawsuits and income taxes. Further, many American corporations have moved a significant portion of their businesses to foreign countries for various financial reasons. In a desire to further grow the U.S. economy, legislators frequently look for ways to encourage the repatriation of these assets.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Repatriation

    The process of converting a foreign currency into the currency ...
  2. Capital Flight

    A large-scale exodus of financial assets and capital from a nation ...
  3. Foreign Investment

    Flows of capital from one nation to another in exchange for significant ...
  4. Foreign Debt

    An outstanding loan that one country owes to another country ...
  5. Blue Chip Swap

    When a domestic investor purchases a foreign asset and then transfers ...
  6. Foreign Tax Credit

    A non-refundable tax credit for income taxes paid to a foreign ...
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    The Benefits Of Corporate Inversion

    Many U.S. companies have found it advantageous to relocate their headquarters rather than face the highest corporate tax rates in the world regardless of whether income was earned domestically ...
  2. Forex Fundamentals

    6 Factors That Influence Exchange Rates

    An in depth look at out how a currency's relative value reflects a country's economic health and impacts your investment returns.
  3. Professionals

    International Economic Factors

    FINRA Series 6 Exam Study Guide - International Economic Factors. This section discusses international factors such as currency exchange rates, balance of trade (BOT) and Balance of Payments.
  4. Investing Basics

    What is a Real Asset?

    A real asset is a physical asset that has value.
  5. Economics

    Ever Wanted to Own International Stocks? Here's How

    Tips and strategies for users to trade in different exchanges around the world.
  6. Forex Education

    Forex Tutorial: Economic Theories, Models, Feeds & Data

    There is a great deal of academic theory revolving around currencies. While often not applicable directly to day-to-day trading, it is helpful to understand the overarching ideas behind the ...
  7. Retirement

    What Taxes Do I Owe On Retirement Accounts Abroad?

    If you're a U.S. retiree, but previously worked abroad, here's what you need to know about taxes on foreign pensions and retirement accounts.
  8. Investing Basics

    What's an Asset?

    An asset is a resource with economic value.
  9. Economics

    5 Economic Effects Of Country Liberalization

    Liberalization provides new opportunities for diversification and profit.
  10. Taxes

    6 Tax Forms for Investors Who Have Money Abroad

    If you're a U.S. citizen or resident, and you own assets in other countries, you might need to file these six forms with the government.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the purpose of a "repatriated tax break", and why is it so controversial?

    In 2004, Congress passed the American Jobs Creation Act to create new jobs in an effort to boost the economy. One of the ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are the components of a financial account?

    Understand what the financial account is and how it relates to a country's balance of payments. Learn about the components ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a financial account and a capital account?

    Understand the components of a country's balance of payments. Learn about the difference between a country's financial account ... Read Answer >>
  4. What does it mean when a country has little activity in its capital account?

    Know what a country's capital account represents and understand what the implications are if a country has little activity ... Read Answer >>
  5. What are the advantages of foreign portfolio investment?

    Learn the advantages that businesses can derive from foreign portfolio investment in an increasingly globalized business ... Read Answer >>
  6. What does a negative balance in the capital account mean?

    Understand what a country's capital account represents and the significance of a negative, or deficit, balance in the capital ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Law Of Demand

    A microeconomic law that states that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, consumer ...
  2. Cost Of Debt

    The effective rate that a company pays on its current debt. This can be measured in either before- or after-tax returns; ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will ...
  5. Keynesian Economics

    An economic theory of total spending in the economy and its effects on output and inflation. Keynesian economics was developed ...
  6. Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications ...

    A member-owned cooperative that provides safe and secure financial transactions for its members. Established in 1973, the ...
Trading Center