Repatriable

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DEFINITION of 'Repatriable'

Refers to the ability of an asset to be moved from a foreign country back to an investor's home country. Assets such as cash and securities are considered highly repatriable, while assets such as foreign real estate and business ownership are considered to have a low level of repatriability. Barriers to repatriation may include the physical nature of the asset, laws of the foreign country, and laws of the investor's home country.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Repatriable'

Many Americans have legally and/or illegally moved their assets "offshore" to protect them from both lawsuits and income taxes. Further, many American corporations have moved a significant portion of their businesses to foreign countries for various financial reasons. In a desire to further grow the U.S. economy, legislators frequently look for ways to encourage the repatriation of these assets.

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