Repricing Opportunity

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DEFINITION of 'Repricing Opportunity'

The change in interest rate of an interest-sensitive asset or liability. Banks earn income from interest, so their income fluctuates with changes in interest rates. A bank can minimize its interest-rate risk and maximize its net interest income by minimizing the differences in repricing opportunities between its assets, such as adjustable-rate mortgages, and its liabilities, such as the rate of interest it pays on customer deposits or certificates of deposit.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Repricing Opportunity'

Depending on the mix of assets and liabilities it holds, repricing opportunities can make a bank either asset-sensitive or liability-sensitive. Banks also experience other types of risk, including: foreign currency exchange rate risk, commodity price risk and trading investment portfolio risk.

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