Repurposing

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Repurposing'

The use of something for a purpose other than its original intended used. Repurposing an item can be done by modifying it to fit a new use, or by using the item as is in a new way. The practice is not limited to physical items, and is a common practice for marketing material and content.


For example, a business may use images from an older, successful advertising campaign in a new campaign rather than come up with brand new images. In the pharmaceutical industry, medications are frequently used to treat illnesses and symptoms for which they weren't originally tested.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Repurposing'

Repurposing is essentially a form of recycling. Instead of throwing an item away, an individual or business finds a new use for it. This can be a cost-effective strategy, since items that can be used instead of discarded prevent a business from having to purchase new, possibly expensive items.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses ...
  2. Depreciation

    1. A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its ...
  3. Tangible Asset

    Assets that have a physical form. Tangible assets include both ...
  4. Property, Plant And Equipment - ...

    A company asset that is vital to business operations but cannot ...
  5. Acquisition Cost

    1. The cost that a company recognizes on its books for property ...
  6. Big Data

    The growth in the volume of structured and unstructured data, ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Patents Are Assets, So Learn How To Value Them

    Innovation is the key to staying on top. Find out how companies protect their ideas and how to figure out how much they're worth.
  2. Investing Basics

    The Merger - What To Do When Companies Converge

    Learn how to invest in companies before, during and after they join together.
  3. Investing Basics

    How To Evaluate A Company's Balance Sheet

    Asset performance shows how what a company owes and owns affects its investment quality.
  4. Markets

    Intangible Assets Provide Real Value To Stocks

    Intangible assets don't appear on balance sheets, but they're crucial to judging a company's value.
  5. Active Trading

    Economic Moats: A Successful Company's Best Defense

    Find out why some companies thrive while others flounder.
  6. Economics

    What types of consumer goods demonstrate the price elasticity of demand?

    Learn how the price elasticity of demand is more sensitive for some types of consumer goods than others, and see what factors most influence elasticity.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Google Ads Vs. Facebook Ads

    Universal access to the internet through smartphones, tablets and computers has driven the success of numerous companies. Most notably, Google and Facebook have witnessed staggering growth as ...
  8. Entrepreneurship

    How does a customer base dictate goodwill?

    Find out how a customer base dictates the value of the goodwill by providing a ready market for its products and spreading the word about the firm.
  9. Entrepreneurship

    How do companies like ClickBank help websites make money?

    Find out how sites such as ClickBank help websites make money by offering the opportunity for vendors and affiliates to promote websites and products.
  10. Personal Finance

    How Shazam Makes Money

    Prior to universal access to digital technology, identifying music in restaurants, bars, or stores was difficult to nearly impossible. Founded in 2000, Shazam provided a readily-available solution ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  2. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  3. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  4. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  5. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
  6. Break-Even Analysis

    An analysis to determine the point at which revenue received equals the costs associated with receiving the revenue. Break-even ...
Trading Center