Request For Proposal - RFP


DEFINITION of 'Request For Proposal - RFP'

A type of bidding solicitation in which a company or organization announces that funding is available for a particular project or program, and companies can place bids for the project's completion. The Request For Proposal (RFP) outlines the bidding process and contract terms, and provides guidance on how the bid should be formatted and presented. A RFP is typically open to a wide range of bidders, creating open competition between companies looking for work.

BREAKING DOWN 'Request For Proposal - RFP'

A Request For Proposal for a specific program may require the company to review the bids not only examine their feasibility , but also the health of the bidding company and the ability of the bidder to actually do what is proposed. The RFP may provide detailed information on the project or program, but can leave leeway for the bidder to fill in the blanks with how the project would be completed or program run.

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