Reserve Requirements

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DEFINITION of 'Reserve Requirements'

Requirements regarding the amount of funds that banks must hold in reserve against deposits made by their customers. This money must be in the bank's vaults or at the closest Federal Reserve bank.

Also known as "required reserves."

BREAKING DOWN 'Reserve Requirements'

Set by the Fed's board of governors, reserve requirements are one of the three main tools of monetary policy. The other two tools are open market operations and the discount rate.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How are bank reserve requirements determined and how does this affect shareholders?

    In economics, required reserves play an important role in ensuring the stability of banks and how a central bank conducts ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does a large multiplier effect signify?

    The multiplier effect depends on banks' reserve requirements. In macroeconomics, if a country exhibits a large multiplier ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the implications of a low Federal Funds Rate?

    The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which banks borrow reserves from one another. A low federal funds rate implies ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do central banks inject money into the economy?

    Central banks use several different methods to increase (or decrease) the amount of money in the banking system. These actions ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do central banks acquire currency reserves and how much are they required to ...

    A currency reserve is a currency that is held in large amounts by governments and other institutions as part of their foreign ... Read Full Answer >>

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