Requisitioned Property


DEFINITION of 'Requisitioned Property'

Property that is involuntarily seized by a governmental authority for any reason. Requisitioned property can be taken for a number of reasons relating to furtherance of the public good. It can be of any type, including real estate, vehicles, machinery, office equipment or even personal property.

BREAKING DOWN 'Requisitioned Property'

Requisitioned property can be treated as an involuntary conversion. Property sold under the threat of requisition can also be treated as a conversion if the threat is believed to be genuine and imminent. However, the threat of requisition must be confirmed by an actual governmental official and cannot be derived solely from a public announcement. In most cases, the requisition will be presented as a formal written demand.

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