Reservable Deposit


DEFINITION of 'Reservable Deposit'

A bank deposit subject to reserve requirements. Reserve requirements are set by the Federal Reserve's board of governors and are a tool of monetary policy.

The required reserves are also known as "sterile reserves," because they do not earn interest.

BREAKING DOWN 'Reservable Deposit'

The Federal Reserve Board requires banks to hold a certain percentage of customer deposits in their vaults or at the nearest Federal Reserve bank. This practice is known as fractional reserve banking, because only a fraction of customer deposits are kept on hand for immediate withdrawal. The rest of the money is loaned out so the bank can earn interest on it.

Critics consider the lack of interest earned on required reserves to be a tax on banks and think that the Federal Reserve should pay a market interest rate on deposits kept at Federal Reserve banks. They also argue that the U.S. reserve requirement of 10% is too high to allow U.S. banks to compete with banks in other developed countries that have lower requirements.

  1. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board ...
  2. Federal Reserve Bank

    The central bank of the United States and the most powerful financial ...
  3. Proof Of Deposit - POD

    The verification that the dollar amount of a check or draft being ...
  4. Reserve Requirements

    Requirements regarding the amount of funds that banks must hold ...
  5. Bank Run

    A situation that occurs when a large number of bank or other ...
  6. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
Related Articles
  1. Credit & Loans

    The Evolution Of Banking

    Banks are a part of ancient history. Find out how this system of money management developed into what we know today.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Breaking Down The Fed Model

    Learn what pundits mean when they say that stocks are undervalued according to the Fed model.
  3. Personal Finance

    How The U.S. Government Formulates Monetary Policy

    Learn about the tools the Fed uses to influence interest rates and general economic conditions.
  4. Forex Education

    Get To Know The Major Central Banks

    The policies of these banks affect the currency market like nothing else. See what makes them tick.
  5. Personal Finance

    How The Federal Reserve Was Formed

    Find out how this institution has stabilized the U.S. economy during economic downturn.
  6. Investing

    In Search of the Rate-Proof Portfolio

    After October’s better-than-expected employment report, a December Federal Reserve (Fed) liftoff is looking more likely than it was earlier this fall.
  7. Investing

    Time to Bring Active Back into a Portfolio?

    While stocks have rallied since the economic recovery in 2009, many active portfolio managers have struggled to deliver investor returns in excess.
  8. Investing

    What a Family Tradition Taught Me About Investing

    We share some lessons from friends and family on saving money and planning for retirement.
  9. Investing Basics

    Why Interest Rates Affect Everyone

    Learn why interest rates are one of the most important economic variables and how every individual and business is affected by rate changes.
  10. Investing

    Where the Price is Right for Dividends

    There are two broad schools of thought for equity income investing: The first pays the highest dividend yields and the second focuses on healthy yields.
  1. How do you make working capital adjustments in transfer pricing?

    Transfer pricing refers to prices that a multinational company or group charges a second party operating in a different tax ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Marginal propensity to Consume (MPC) Vs. Save (MPS)

    Historically, because people in the United States have shown a higher propensity to consume, this is likely the more important ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What happens if interest rates increase too quickly?

    When interest rates increase too quickly, it can cause a chain reaction that affects the domestic economy as well as the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. When was the last time the Federal Reserve hiked interest rates?

    The last time the U.S. Federal Reserve increased the federal funds rate was in June 2006, when the rate was increased from ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do lower interest rates increase investment spending?

    Lower Interest rates encourage additional investment spending, which gives the economy a boost in times of slow economic ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Who decides to print money in Russia?

    The Central Bank of the Russian Federation (CBRF), like its peers in most countries, is the governmental entity responsible ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Take A Bath

    A slang term referring to the situation of an investor who has experienced a large loss from an investment or speculative ...
  2. Black Friday

    1. A day of stock market catastrophe. Originally, September 24, 1869, was deemed Black Friday. The crash was sparked by gold ...
  3. Turkey

    Slang for an investment that yields disappointing results or turns out worse than expected. Failed business deals, securities ...
  4. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  5. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  6. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
Trading Center