Reserve Bank Of New Zealand

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DEFINITION of 'Reserve Bank Of New Zealand'

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand is New Zealand's central bank and its overall purpose is to maintain the stability of New Zealand's financial system. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand is also responsible for maintaining monetary policy, meeting the currency needs of the public and providing support services for other banks. In 2007, New Zealand's government decided to expand the role of the Reserve Bank by increasing its regulatory oversight to include not only banks but also building societies, credit unions, insurance and finance companies.

BREAKING DOWN 'Reserve Bank Of New Zealand'

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand started operations in 1934 after the passing of the Reserve Bank Act of 1933. Unlike the United States Federal Reserve, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand does not have any private owners. It is entirely owned by the New Zealand government.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the name of the currency in New Zealand?

    The New Zealand currency is known as the New Zealand dollar. The currency was decimalized in 1967, and divided into 100 parts ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is the Federal Reserve audited?

    Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Federal Reserve is extensively audited. Politicians on the left and right of a populist ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Who decides when to print money in the US?

    The U.S. Treasury decides to print money in the United States as it owns and operates printing presses. However, the Federal ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can the federal reserve increase aggregate demand?

    The Federal Reserve can increase aggregate demand in indirect ways by lowering interest rates. Aggregate demand is a measure ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does the stock market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The stock market reacts to changes in the federal funds rate in various ways depending on where it is in the business cycle. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>

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