Reset Margin

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DEFINITION of 'Reset Margin'

The difference between the interest rate of a security and the index on which the security's interest rate is based. The reset margin will be positive, as it is always added to the underlying index. This feature is most common with a floating-rate security. The reset margin is added to a reference rate, such as LIBOR, for floating rate obligations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Reset Margin'

For example, the interest rate of a floating-rate note is based on LIBOR plus 0.5%. The 0.5% is the reset margin, meaning that if LIBOR is 1% then the interest rate on the note is 1.5%. Banks can borrow money at LIBOR and, in order to realize profits on loans, will add the reset margin when lending funds.

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