Resident Alien

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DEFINITION of 'Resident Alien'

A foreigner who is a permanent resident of the country in which he or she resides but does not have citizenship. To fall under this classification in the U.S., you need to either currently have a green card or have had one in the last calendar year. You also fall under the U.S. classification of resident alien if you have been in the U.S. for more than 31 days during the current year along with having been in the U.S. for at least 183 days over a three-year period that includes the current year.

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BREAKING DOWN 'Resident Alien'

Resident and non-resident aliens have different filing advantages and disadvantages. For example, a resident alien can use foreign tax credits, whereas a non-resident cannot. However, in general, a resident alien is subject to the same taxes as a U.S. citizen, while a non-resident alien only pays tax on income that is generated within the U.S, not including capital gains.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. I am a non-U.S. citizen living outside the U.S. and trading stocks through a U.S. ...

    The tax implications for a foreign investor will depend on whether that person is classified as a resident alien or a non-resident ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I file taxes for income from foreign sources?

    If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, your income (except for amounts exempt under federal law), including that which ... Read Full Answer >>
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    According to the IRS, over 22 million taxpayers received $41.4 billion dollars in earned income tax credit (EITC) for tax ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. As a temporary resident of the US, can I withdraw funds from my Traditional IRA without ...

    Should you decide to invest in a Traditional IRA and receive a tax deduction for your contribution, the amounts that you ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Your spousal Social Security benefits may be taxable, depending on your total household income for the year. About one-third ... Read Full Answer >>
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