Residual Value

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Residual Value'

How much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
If you lease a car for three years, its residual value is how much it is worth after three years. The residual value is determined by the bank that issues the lease before the lease begins. It is based on past models and future predictions. It is an important factor in determining the car's monthly lease payments (the other factors are the interest rate and tax). In capital budgeting projects, residual values reflect how much you can sell the asset for after the firm has finished using it or once the asset-generated cash flows can no longer be accurately forecasted.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Residual Value'

If you are a business owner, let's say your desk has a useful life of seven years. How much the desk is worth at the end of seven years (its fair market value as determined by agreement or appraisal) is its residual value (also known as salvage value). To manage asset-value risk, companies that have lots of expensive fixed assets (e.g., machine tools, vehicles, medical equipment) may purchase residual value insurance to guarantee the value of properly maintained assets at the ends of their useful lives.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Closed-End Lease

    A rental agreement that puts no obligation on the lessee (the ...
  2. Fair Market Value

    The price that a given property or asset would fetch in the marketplace, ...
  3. Walk-Away Lease

    A common type of car lease in which the lessee returns the car ...
  4. Appraisal

    A valuation of property (ie. real estate, a business, an antique) ...
  5. Finance

    The science that describes the management, creation and study ...
  6. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses ...
Related Articles
  1. An Introduction To Depreciation
    Active Trading

    An Introduction To Depreciation

  2. Depreciation: Straight-Line Vs. Double-Declining ...
    Forex Education

    Depreciation: Straight-Line Vs. Double-Declining ...

  3. New Wheels: Lease Or Buy?
    Home & Auto

    New Wheels: Lease Or Buy?

  4. Are Your Children Destroying Your Retirement?
    Retirement

    Are Your Children Destroying Your Retirement?

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Ghosting

    An illegal practice whereby two or more market makers collectively attempt to influence and change the price of a stock. ...
  2. Elasticity

    A measure of a variable's sensitivity to a change in another variable. In economics, elasticity refers the degree to which ...
  3. Tangible Common Equity - TCE

    A measure of a company's capital, which is used to evaluate a financial institution's ability to deal with potential losses. ...
  4. Yield To Maturity (YTM)

    The rate of return anticipated on a bond if held until the maturity date. YTM is considered a long-term bond yield expressed ...
  5. Net Present Value Of Growth Opportunities - NPVGO

    A calculation of the net present value of all future cash flows involved with an additional acquisition, or potential acquisition. ...
  6. Gresham's Law

    A monetary principle stating that "bad money drives out good." In currency valuation, Gresham's Law states that if a new ...
Trading Center