Resolution Trust Corporation - RTC

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DEFINITION of 'Resolution Trust Corporation - RTC'

A temporary federal agency established under the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act (FIRREA), enacted on Aug. 9, 1989, to resolve the savings and loan (S&L) crisis of the 1980s.


The Resolution Trust Corporation (RTC) had a mission to resolve all thrifts placed under conservatorship or receivership between Jan. 1, 1989, and Aug. 8, 1992. The S&L or thrift industry crisis had resulted in the biggest collapse of U.S. financial institutions since the 1930s. The RTC accomplished its mission by closing, selling or merging troubled thrifts and disposing of assets in an expeditious manner.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Resolution Trust Corporation - RTC'

By mid-1995, the RTC had resolved 747 thrifts, with total assets of $394 billion. The RTC's authorization to take over thrifts was extended twice, because of the magnitude of the S&L crisis. The RTC ceased operations on Dec. 31, 1995.

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