Restricted Asset

DEFINITION of 'Restricted Asset'

Money or other items of value received by or promised to an organization, the use of which is legally or contractually restricted. Restricted assets are also subject to special accounting procedures. Collateral can be viewed as a restricted asset, especially when the lender requires that it maintain its current value.

BREAKING DOWN 'Restricted Asset'

An example of a restricted asset is the proceeds from a revenue bond. The proceeds the city receives from this type of municipal bond must be used for their stated purpose (e.g., improving roads, building a new high school auditorium, upgrading sewers, etc.). The opposite of a restricted asset is an unrestricted asset.

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