Restructuring Charge

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DEFINITION of 'Restructuring Charge'

A one-time cost that must be paid by a company when it reorganizes. A restructuring charge might be incurred in the process of furloughing or laying off employees, closing manufacturing plants, shifting production to a new location or writing off assets. When a company restructures, it is usually experiencing significant problems and restructuring is an attempt to improve the business and recover financially.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Restructuring Charge'

A restructuring charge will cost a company money in the short run, but it is meant to save the company money in the long run. A restructuring charge will be mentioned in stock analysis as lowering a company's operating income and diluted earnings. Restructuring charges will often have a significant effect on a company's income statement as a result.

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