Retail Credit Facility

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DEFINITION of 'Retail Credit Facility'

A financing method which provides loan services to retail consumers for goods and services. Retail credit facilities lend funds to consumers wishing to purchase high ticket items but are short on capital. Thus, retail credit facilities may enable a greater number of consumers access to a retailer's goods.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Retail Credit Facility'

Retail credit facilities can take the form of point of sale finance options in retail outlets. For example a $10,000 motorcycle might be a lot for a consumer to pay up front. Retail credit facilities will loan the $10,000 to the consumer, who will then pay it back with interest in monthly instalments over several years. Some offer low or even no payments over an initial time period, but then charge above average interest.

Retail credit facilities give the option of consuming now or consuming in the future. Higher interest rates may be acceptable to some consumers, depending on the consumers' unique consumption utilities. The risk of default is a factor that determines the interest rate that retail credit facilities charge.

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