Retail Repurchase Agreement

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DEFINITION of 'Retail Repurchase Agreement'

An alternative to regular savings deposits. Under a retail repurchase agreement, an investor buys a pool of securities in aggregate denominations of less than $100,000 for a term of less than 90 days. The agreement is not automatically renewable.

Also known as a "retail repo."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Retail Repurchase Agreement'

Unlike regular savings deposits, retail repurchase agreements are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, are not guaranteed, and may lose value. They are classified as securities transactions and, as such, are subject to default risk.

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