Retail Investor


DEFINITION of 'Retail Investor'

Individual investors who buy and sell securities for their personal account, and not for another company or organization.

Also known as an "individual investor" or "small investor".

BREAKING DOWN 'Retail Investor'

Retail investors buy in much smaller quantities than larger institutional investors.

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  2. Do working capital funds expire?

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  3. How long does a stock account have to be dormant before it can be escheated?

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  4. Do banks have working capital?

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  5. Does working capital include inventory?

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