What is a 'Retail Investor'

A retail investor is an individual investors who buy and sell securities for their personal account, and not for another company or organization.

Also known as an "individual investor" or "small investor".

BREAKING DOWN 'Retail Investor'

Retail investors buy in much smaller quantities than larger institutional investors.

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