Retirement Income Fund - RIF

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Retirement Income Fund - RIF'

A group of investment products available to anyone as a conservative means of saving for retirement. A RIF is generally a mutual fund that is well diversified in large and mid-cap stocks and bonds. A RIF balances its portfolio to allow for moderate gains using a conservative approach to attempt to retain value while providing income to investors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Retirement Income Fund - RIF'

Retirement income funds are actively managed funds that are intended to provide conservative, moderate growth for assets tucked away for retirement purposes, such as IRAs. There is no special tax treatment for these funds despite their name; they are treated as normal mutual fund investments. As a mutual fund, they are exposed to market risk and are, therefore, not a guaranteed retirement income - although they are invested conservatively. Some types of retirement income funds pay out regular distributions, such as monthly or quarterly. This type of fund usually has a required minimum investment and will incur fees similar to other mutual fund products.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Diversification

    A risk management technique that mixes a wide variety of investments ...
  2. Asset Allocation Fund

    A mutual fund that provides investors with a portfolio of a fixed ...
  3. Individual Retirement Account - ...

    An investing tool used by individuals to earn and earmark funds ...
  4. Retirement Planning

    The process of determining retirement income goals and the actions ...
  5. Mutual Fund

    An investment vehicle that is made up of a pool of funds collected ...
  6. Current Service Benefit

    The amount of pension benefit accrued by an employee who had ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do no-load funds typically perform relative to load funds?

    No-load mutual funds are pooled investments that do not carry an upfront sales charge when purchased or a deferred sales ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the most popular mutual funds that invest primarily in the insurance sector?

    Under the purview of the financial services industry, the insurance sector is an attractive investment option for mutual ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How should I use portfolio turnover to evaluate a mutual fund?

    The portfolio turnover percentage can be used to determine the extent to which a mutual fund turns over its stocks and assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the risks involved in a banker's acceptance?

    College savings accounts are excellent ways to encourage saving for future college costs. Contact your investment professional ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. For what reasons are electronics stocks commonly purchased by a value investor?

    Administered by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), the Series 6 exam – Investment Company and Variable ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between a modified duration and a Macaulay duration?

    Individuals have a handful of options for places to keep the funds they wish to keep guarded from the volatility and risk ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Passing The Buck: The Hidden Costs Of Annuities

    These may look like good retirement vehicles, but beware of the fees buried in the fine print.
  2. Budgeting

    Managing Income During Retirement

    Learn some sensible strategies for making your hard-earned savings last for as long as you need them.
  3. Options & Futures

    Getting the Whole Story on Variable Annuities

    Variable annuities are another way to save money tax-deferred - but don't jump in blindly!
  4. Options & Futures

    What Is A Registered Investment Advisor?

    Hoping for a career in the financial services industry? Working for an RIA may fit the bill.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Mutual Fund Basics Tutorial

    Learn about the basics - and the pitfalls - of investing in mutual funds.
  6. Investing Basics

    Understanding Open-End Funds

    An open-end fund is a type of mutual fund that does not limit the amount of shares it issues, but issues as many shares as investors are willing to buy.
  7. Retirement

    Understanding Defined Benefit Pension Plans

    An employer-sponsored retirement plan where employee benefits are based on a formula using factors such as salary history and duration of employment.
  8. Professionals

    Help Parents Avoid This Retirement Savings Blunder

    Parents should make saving for their own retirement a priority over helping with their children’s college costs.
  9. Professionals

    Why Retirement Planning Differs for Women

    Women face unique challenges when it comes to saving for retirement compared to men. Here's why and how to better prepare.
  10. Investing

    Financial Gifts For Grads: Kindergarten To College

    If you really want to help your grad preparing for the future, consider a present that supports their long-term goals—an early start to financial planning.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  2. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  3. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  4. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  5. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  6. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
Trading Center