Retirement of Securities

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DEFINITION of 'Retirement of Securities'

1. The cancellation of stocks or bonds because the issuer has bought them back.

2. The removal of an asset from securities markets because its maturity date has been reached.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Retirement of Securities'

Another context in which you might hear the term is the "retirement of debt," which means debt has been paid off.

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