DEFINITION of 'Retractable Bond'

A bond that features an option for the holder to force the issuer to redeem the bond before maturity at par value. An investor may choose to shorten the maturity on a bond because of market conditions or if he or she requires the principal sooner than expected.

BREAKING DOWN 'Retractable Bond'

For example, a company might issue 20-year retractable bonds to the market. This means the investor who buys the bond from the issuer has the right to receive the par value or face value of the bond at any time before maturity. If the investor exercises the right to retract, then he or she will forgo the rest of the coupon payments on the bond. An investor might exercise this option due to unfavorable market conditions such as a rise in interest rates. An increase in interest rates would translate into lower bond prices. As a result, investors may want to switch to higher-yielding bonds.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Extendable Bond

    A long-term debt security that includes an option to lengthen ...
  2. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable ...
  3. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  4. Bond Yield

    The amount of return an investor will realize on a bond. Several ...
  5. Term To Maturity

    The remaining life of a financial instrument. In bonds, it is ...
  6. Pull To Par

    The movement of a bond's price toward its face value as it approaches ...
Related Articles
  1. Financial Advisor

    7 Questions to Consider Before Investing in Bonds

    There is a significant number of questions every investor, private or institutional, should consider before investing in bonds.
  2. Investing

    How To Choose The Right Bond For You

    Bond investing is a stable and low-risk way to diversify a portfolio. However, knowing which types of bonds are right for you is not always easy.
  3. Investing

    Key Strategies To Avoid Negative Bond Returns

    It is difficult to make money in bonds in a rising rate environment, but there are ways to avoid losses.
  4. Investing

    Corporate Bonds: Advantages and Disadvantages

    Corporate bonds can provide compelling returns, even in low-yield environments. But they are not without risk.
  5. Investing

    The Basics Of Municipal Bonds

    Investing in these bonds may offer a tax-free income stream but they are not without risks.
  6. Investing

    5 Basic Things To Know About Bonds

    Learn these basic terms to breakdown this seemingly complex investment area.
  7. Financial Advisor

    Using Excel PV Function to compute Bonds PV

    To determine the value of a bond today - for a fixed principal (par value) to be repaid in the future at any predetermined time - we can use an Excel spreadsheet.
  8. Investing

    The Basics Of Bonds

    Bonds play an important part in your portfolio as you age; learning about them makes good financial sense.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Can the marginal propensity to consume ever be negative?

    Find out when a bond's yield to maturity is equal to its coupon rate, and learn about the basic components of bonds and how ... Read Answer >>
  2. How does face value differ from the price of a bond?

    Discover how bonds are traded as investment securities and understand the various terms used in bond trading, including par ... Read Answer >>
  3. Why is my bond worth less than face value?

    Find out how bonds can be issued or traded for less than their listed face values, and learn what causes bond prices to fluctuate ... Read Answer >>
  4. What types of fees apply to checking accounts?

    Learn about the difference between a bond's coupon rate and its yield to maturity, and how the par value, coupon rate and ... Read Answer >>
  5. Should investors focus more on the current yield or face value of a bond?

    Find out when investors should focus on a bond's current yield versus its face value, including an example of how current ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Down Round

    A round of financing where investors purchase stock from a company at a lower valuation than the valuation placed upon the ...
  2. Keynesian Economics

    An economic theory of total spending in the economy and its effects on output and inflation. Keynesian economics was developed ...
  3. Portfolio Investment

    A holding of an asset in a portfolio. A portfolio investment is made with the expectation of earning a return on it. This ...
  4. Treynor Ratio

    A ratio developed by Jack Treynor that measures returns earned in excess of that which could have been earned on a riskless ...
  5. Buyback

    The repurchase of outstanding shares (repurchase) by a company in order to reduce the number of shares on the market. Companies ...
  6. Tax Refund

    A tax refund is a refund on taxes paid to an individual or household when the actual tax liability is less than the amount ...
Trading Center