Return On Research Capital - RORC

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DEFINITION of 'Return On Research Capital - RORC'

A calculation used to assess the revenue a company brings in as a result of expenditures made on research and development activities. Return on research capital (RORC) is a component of productivity and growth, since research and development (R&D) is one of the ways in which companies develop new products and services for sale. This metric is commonly used in industries that rely heavily on R&D such as the pharmaceutical industry.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Return On Research Capital - RORC'

Companies face an opportunity cost when examining the use of their funds. They can spend money on tangible assets, real estate or capital improvements, or they can invest in R&D. Investments made in research may take a number of years before tangible results are seen, and the return typically varies between industries and even within sectors of a particular industry.

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